CSAD Instagram Questions

Why do I make art?

I make art to express my concerns and notions. I make art because I can not exist otherwise. I strongly believe that art is a means of protest as well as a way of questioning the fundamentals.

What am I making at the moment?

I enjoy creating with several mediums, I lately use photography. Through capturing moments and scenes I unveil the beauty of reality that is frequently forgotten. My interest mainly focuses on street photography and urban fabric. In my frames, I include little details of the streets, illegal public and street art as well as urban structures. However, I also enjoy photographing house utilities and objects that form my everyday routine, trying to create a series of similar pictures at different times and places. 

How has lockdown affected my practice?

Due to the Covid-19 breakdown, I was forced to focus more on my “house experience” during the quarantine period. Hence, my work currently formes by a body of work influenced by my everyday reality, the low creativity, and low motivation of the period. However, it helped me to concentrate and experiment with new ideas such as performance art. My online Degree Show Exhibition was an Instagram performance were I was uploading a spontaneous phone picture every 10 minutes for 24 hours. My aim was to express and question my contemporary addictions and obsessions to and with the image as well as commentate on the countless information that pops up every second on social media. With humor, I tried to attract my followers’ attention to the exaggeration of the individual’s privacy exposure.

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Catalog Artist Statement

 

 

Maria Paraschidou

BA (HONS) Fine Art

marioparasch@gmail.com

07594700802

mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com

 

My practice is about exploring the streets that we live in. I believe that we ignore the power that we have to challenge and change the norms of how public space is perceived and configured. My art tries to unveil the uniqueness of urban reality as well as its relationship with the contemporary human. 

My work is currently embodied in three different ways of image-making. Black and white film photography, high-quality digital photography, and low-quality phone photography. Through film photography, I found a way of protesting against my addiction to fast art and fast image creation. I slowed down and observed more. The slow image-making procedure of film photography enables me to spotlight the pleasant monotony of every single experience. By framing little details that surround me on my everyday routine, I try to highlight the ignored and the not important. Inspired by the overwhelming bombarding of information through social media, I wanted to throw my work into a new experience, outside my safe zone. The limited number of images that can be captured through film photography forces me to pay attention to the framed material, thus, uncover a unique beauty of reality. 

However, due to Covid-19, I was forced to change my practice. Being unable to interact within the street and develop my films, I was forced to use digital cameras and capture my “house experience” during the lockdown. Contrastingly, I chose to overuse digital photography and create countless images of similar objects and scenes inside my personal living space.

Influenced by the current situation of Covid-19 and the countless information bombarding social media, I forced myself to deeper explore the contemporary nature of exposure of privacy and everyday routine on social media. Thus, I exposed myself through a 24hour Instagram performance during which I recursively posted numerous spontaneous, non-premeditated, low-quality phone images every ten minutes. Through my practice I question fundamental qualities and addictions of contemporary life.

 

Notes and Unfinished concept ideas:

Frequently, I call myself a painter, I recently stopped painting.

My need to be an artist derives from my necessity of observing very carefully everything that surrounds me. I currently use different kinds of photography exploring slow and fast creation of image as well as the relationship between black and white film photography, high-quality digital photography, and low-quality phone photography. I am interested in the desire that people have of capturing reality yet alternating and editing it afterward.

Through black and white film photography, I was able to unveil the nostalgic side of the image resembling times when you needed to carefully appoint and frame. Hence, the slow prosses of image-making can reveal a lot more than what can be seen, feelings and imagination. A single frame can be developed in different intensities and create various shapes and shades, that uncover a whole new world of little details. Consequently, the image can be transformed from a caption of reality to an artwork reminding different decades.

Digital photography and phone photography on the other hand, force me to explore the contemporary representation of objects and the human form. Vivid color and numerous different images of the same frame uncover addictions and obsessions of the 21st century.

Influenced by the current situation of Covid-19, I forced myself to deeper explore the contemporary nature of image-making of self-representation and everyday routine on social media. By exposing myself through a 24hour Instagram performance of recursively posting images every ten minutes, I questioned fundamental qualities and addictions.

Exploring the exact opposite of what I used to do before Covid-19

My work is about exploring the streets that we live in. I believe that we ignore the power that we have to challenge and change our fundamental norms of public space and our civic landscape. My art tries to unveil the uniqueness of urban reality as well as its relationship with the contemporary human.

My work is currently embodied in three different ways of image-making. Balck and white film photography, high-quality digital photography, and low-quality phone photography.  Through film photography, I found a way of protesting against my addiction to fast art and fast image creation. I slowed down and observed more. The slow image-making procedure of film photography enables me to spotlight the monotony and pleasure of every single experience. By framing little details that surround me on my everyday routine, I try to highlight the ignored and the not important. Inspired by the overwhelming bombarding of information through social media, I wanted to throw my work into a new, out of my safe zone, experience. The limited number of images that can be captured through film photography forces me to pay attention to the framed material, thus, uncover a unique beauty of reality.

However, due to Covid-19, I was forced to change my practice. Being unable to interact within the street and develop my films I was forced to use digital cameras and capture my “house experience” during the lockdown. Contrastingly, I chose to overuse digital photography and create countless images of similar objects and landscapes of the house.

Influenced by the current situation of Covid-19 and the bombarded social media with countless information, I forced myself to deeper explore the contemporary nature of image-making of self-representation and everyday routine on social media. By exposing myself through a 24hour Instagram performance of recursively posting numerous low phone quality images every ten minutes, of the particular moment with no previous observation of the environment or planing, I questioned fundamental qualities and addictions of contemporary life.

The final one

Exposure ADZ6888 Final- 2

Post 2: a written statement about your artistic practice. The statement must be no more than 300 words long.

#288notthatmany, Instagram Performance, Maria Paraschidou, Athens, 2020.

Is my life my artistic practice?

Photography enables me to document my life and approach reality from an artistic perspective.

My practice is currently formed by different types of photography. I use photography to capture the beauty of reality that I find in everyday moments, I try to focus on little details that we usually slip by during our everyday routines. I try to find my framed material within my normality and expose moments of personal pleasure and interest.

My work is greatly influenced by my addictions of contemporary life that is heavily linked to social media representation and privacy exposure. Thus, I lately chose to create a preformative piece, captured simply with my phone camera, in order to explore my activity on-line through the original medium of use, the phone. By way of my online performance of posting countless images on Instagram for twenty-four hours, I created a discourse upon themes of overindulgence of image, decadence of the communication networks as well as obsession with self representation and promotion.

Using low quality digital photography I wanted to highlight the aesthetics of our era. When everything takes place online, there is no longer need for a physical venue to host an exhibition. My exhibition was a celebration of the banality of the new era, and simultaneously a critique upon the absence of physical quality and creativity when everything has been done before.

Summative Assessment Consolidation ADZ6333

Artist Statement:

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-artist-statement/

Documentation:

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-1/

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-1-2/

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-3/

 

Contextualisation: 

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-4/

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-5/

https://mariaparaschidou.wordpress.com/2020/05/12/consolidation-adz6333-final-6/

 

Consolidation ADZ6333- Final Artist Statement

IMG_6181
Selfie Corona times, May 2020, Athens Tube.

My practice is about exploring the streets that we live in. I believe that we ignore the power that we have to challenge and change the norms of how public space is perceived and configured. My art tries to unveil the uniqueness of urban reality as well as its relationship with the contemporary human.

My work is currently embodied in three different ways of image-making. Black and white film photography, high-quality digital photography, and low-quality phone photography. Through film photography, I found a way of protesting against my addiction to fast art and fast image creation. I slowed down and observed more. The slow image-making procedure of film photography enables me to spotlight the pleasant monotony of every single experience. By framing little details that surround me on my everyday routine, I try to highlight the ignored and the not important. Inspired by the overwhelming bombarding of information through social media, I wanted to throw my work into a new experience, outside my safe zone. The limited number of images that can be captured through film photography forces me to pay attention to the framed material, thus, uncover a unique beauty of reality.

However, due to Covid-19, I was forced to change my practice. Being unable to interact within the street and develop my films, I was forced to use digital cameras and capture my “house experience” during the lockdown. Contrastingly, I chose to overuse digital photography and create countless images of similar objects and scenes inside my personal living space.

Overwhelmed-Undersaturated Exhibition: Artist’s Statement

 

 

The monotony of joy.

IMG_2951

 

 

Repeat after me

My work is about exploring the streets that we live in. I believe that we ignore the power that we have to challenge and change our fundamental norms of public space and our civic landscape. My art tries to unveil the uniqueness of urban reality.

I call myself “a painter”. I recently stopped painting.

My latest work is a self protest against my need for labeling my art. In this attempt of working differently, I started documenting my life through photography. The slow image-making procedure of film photography enables me to spotlight the monotony and pleasure of every single experience. By framing little details that surround me on my everyday routine, I try to highlight the ignored and the not important. Inspired by the overwhelming bombarding of information through social media, I wanted to throw my work into a new, out of my safe zone, experience. The limited number of images that can be captured through film photography forces me to pay attention to the framed material that I later redevelop or reproduce, revealing the importance of slow observation.

 

I call myself “a painter”. I recently stopped painting.

My latest work is a self protest against my need for labeling my art. In this attempt of working differently, I started documenting my life through photography. The slow image-making procedure of film photography enables me to spotlight the monotony and pleasure of every single experience. By framing little details that surround me on my everyday routine, I tried to highlight the ignored and the not important. Inspired by this exhibition I wanted to throw my work into a new, out of my safe zone, experience. Through a collaboration with an artist and the use of new mediums, like video and performance,  I wanted to explore different fields of art in order to get exposed and develop different motives.

Artist Statement

Maria
Self Portrait, Athens, 2018.

 

Elements from both my cultural background and my everyday surroundings are prominent throughout my work, aspects that I find both appealing and repulsive as crucial inspiration. I use shapes taken from the human form, urban objects and architectural structures and I add intense and playful colours. This way of working transforms objects like roof antennas and accumulated buildings into colourful shapes. With humour, I try to force people to think about the western culture that surrounds us.

By doing my own documentation of the streets with my camera, I then use these images to produce my work. I precisely choose the elements from a picture that I then want to develop into sketches and finally into a finished body of work. Following these steps, I try to maintain the aesthetics of my culture and create a piece that communicates them with the viewer.

Frequently my paintings create a contrasting environment to my sketches as they are created in different ways. The paintings often feature bold harsh coloured lines using spray paint and acrylic, thus they represent the spontaneous life of the streets as well as the fast-developing world that we live in. In contrast, through my sketches, I try to maintain memories that need careful handling when reproducing them through lines. For them, a black pen is more than enough to express simply forms of existence.